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We tested chips – the staple food of the air fryer.  The recipe book that comes with the unit recommended a temperature setting of 450 °F and a timer of 20 minutes.  At the end of the time (including flipping the chips over midway) we found the chips on the edge of the mesh basket to be cooked more than the ones in the center.  We had to cook the chips for 5 minutes longer to get all of them to a good level of crispiness.  It’s not a huge deal, but other air fryers like the Phillips XL and Black and Decker obviously have a better way of circulating the hot air more evenly.  Luckily there is a 60 minute timer which we feel is needed since food is probably going to take longer then you expect with this unit.
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From there, I tried another recipe in the Philips recipe booklet: shrimp on lemongrass skewers with sweet potato fries. The idea is that you're supposed to cook it all in batches, a detail that subtly pops up on the very last line of the recipe. My estimate is that you'd have to do the fries in (at least) two batches, followed by the shrimp in two, turning it into 60 minutes of cooking time. Compare that to cooking the fries in the oven (there wasn't much difference in taste in the fries between the three methods), then blasting the shrimp under the broiler. Don't get me wrong, the results of all three methods for the shrimp were excellent, but the oven and broiler gave me more options and slightly superior results, and, thanks to the relatively luxurious amount of space in my oven, I could cook much more food in about half the time.
The NuWave Brio air fried more evenly than most from one end of the basket to the other. Also, this machine adds a level of multitasking and ease of use that sets it apart. The Brio can air fry, bake, roast, broil, toast and grill right out of the box, and it has a smart interface and a compact design. Cleaning the wire basket is a little bit of a pain, but the level of crispiness was worth it.
So, what can you make in an air fryer? The possibilities are limitless—and you can use an air fryer to make comfort food favorites that are normally deep-fried, sauteed, baked, or grilled. So whether you've craving onion rings, French toast, or cheesy loaded potatoes, here are 35 delicious air fryer recipes to show you how to make the most of this amazingly versatile kitchen tool. 
If you’re into meal prepping or are vegan, you know the beauty of the sweet potato, that versatile spud that’s good for you and takes well to any flavor you can imagine. You also know how long they take to cook, and that, as fries, they never really get that crispy. This is not the case in an air fryer, where the circulated high heat partially dehydrates the outside to a crisp, similar to eggplant, while cooking the insides until soft. Whether cut into fries, cubes, or spears, sweet potatoes cook up much faster than in the oven.
Most air fryers come with accessories that are sold separately, such as a cake pan or grill pan, but we found them to be gimmicky add-ons that didn’t prove useful. Most manufacturers, such as Philips, sell several accessories separately. However, we can’t justify spending $20 to $40 on additional pieces when each air fryer model is already exorbitantly priced.

An appliance I wish I had bought a long time ago! Discovered even one tablespoon of oil was too much to make really crispy french fries. Appreciate not having to deal with a pot of frying oil, as well as the calories I didn't take in because mine were air fried. Only thing I would hope for is an accessory second shelf such as the one Philip's makes for their model. The photo I've uploaded is the remainder of fries after my husband and I had our generous portions.
And not only did I think we were not going to use it, I especially did not want another “thing” on my kitchen counter. Extra stuff on my kitchen counters is really one of my pet peeves. I really despise anything being dumped on them, whether it’s mail, car keys, computers…take them to your room and keep them there! But that’s a rant for another day.
The racks are great because you can cook on up to 5 racks at a time. Foods that are battered stick no matter what you do. The manufacturers suggest you spray racks with olive oil, canola oil, PAM, etc. I have done that and they still stick. If you just cook without batter, it still sticks. I recently cooked some French Bread Pizza and I couldn't get it to cook without overcooking it. Definitely do not use the box's time, it'll be burnt to a crisp. I wouldn't suggest buying this item. Also, if you want to cook rotisserie chicken, you can only use a 4 lb chicken. This is also a small unit that I bought, so it limits the size of chickens, etc.

The Avance didn’t outperform our top pick with homemade fries, but it was still significantly better than our other air fryers, which either overcooked the fries or didn’t brown them enough to have much of any texture or taste. The Avance aced our chicken strip testing, with one saying they would even order them in a restaurant. We also appreciated the fact that we didn’t have to stir the strips at all during cooking: They came out perfectly crispy on the outside, yet tender on the inside.
This unit comes with a mesh basket and divider so you can cook two portions of food at once.  We also liked that the timer can be set up to 60 minutes which is double that of other models such as the GoWise or Avalon Bay Air Fryer.  On the top of the model, you’ll find two indicator lights, one for when the air fryer is turned on and the other for when the preheat temperature is reached.  This is a cool feature as it means you’re only cooking at the temperature that you set rather than wasting time as it heats up.

Of course, there's nothing wrong with treating yourself every now and then, in moderation. The issue with these fatty food options is that eating them too frequently can sometimes lead to health issues. And even if that's not the case, the guilt we feel after giving in to the temptation of a greasy meal was enough to send us searching for an alternative.


From the reviews, we noticed many consumers were not using their air fryers on a regular basis. Even though it's an air fryer, it creates grease during the cooking process. People would get a messy surprise when opening their air fryer after not using it for some time. This often happened due to the difficulty of cleaning the areas where grease accumulates.
I followed the Leah Chase's Oven-Fried Chicken recipe to test the second batch of chicken. After dredging, I brushed each piece of chicken with a light coat of olive oil in order to soak up the flour and prevent it from caking up and not “frying” correctly. I set the airfryer to 410°F for 30 minutes and preheat the oven at 425°F. However, 10 minutes into baking, the oven started to smoke really bad, so I turned the temperature down to 400°F. (I suspect the excess flour on the pan was burning.) Halfway through cooking, I flipped the chicken in both the oven and air fryer and noticed the bottom breading stuck to the basket in the air fryer, so I would definitely recommend spraying the basket with cooking spray. Naturally, the oven batch took 15 minutes longer (45 minutes total) to cook since I turned the temperature down. The air fryer chicken again cooked quicker, was crisper, and did not smoke up the kitchen. In fact, the air fryer batch was delightfully crispy and the breading was fully cooked through—no soggy bits to be seen. The drawback, again, was that it could only hold a few pieces of chicken. That said, though the oven batch may not have been quite a crisp in the breading, I will say, the flesh was much juicer. 
Enjoy all of your favorite fried foods without the guilt! The Power AirFryer Oven replaces many of your kitchen appliances for crisp, healthy, delicious food. This state-of-the-art air fryer uses little to no oil, relying instead on the power of superheated air up to 400'F. Just choose from eight pre-set buttons for one-touch convenience that delivers your favorite fried foods like extra-crispy chicken fingers, veggies and more. The Power AirFryer Oven also is an added rotisserie, so you can make savory pork roast, mouthwatering turkey breast and authentic kebabs. Use the dehydrator function to make healthy vegetables, herbs, fruit and more. Stainless-steel air flow racks and 1700 watts of Air Flow Technology cooks food on both the top and bottom for the crispy-fried taste and texture you love without the fat and calories. Toast, cake, pies, pastas, chicken � this multicooker even fits a 9" round pizza! The entire AirFryer Oven library is also included with recipes for fried food, rotisserie and dehydrator creations.
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